Holland to Netherlands video chat on wind energy open to the public

Grand Valley State University is hosting a public meeting on the benefits and challenges of offshore wind energy development - with a special focus on tourism - from 10 a.m. to noon Monday, Dec. 5.
Anonymous
Nov 30, 2011

 

The meeting, in a partnership with Michigan Sea Grant and the Michigan Energy Office, will take place in Room 102 of the GVSU Meijer Campus in Holland. It will include a video chat from people in the Netherlands who live and work near an offshore wind farm.

Representatives from the West Michigan tourism and government sectors, along with community members, can ask questions about how the Egmond aan Zee offshore wind farm has affected tourism in coastal communities in the Netherlands. Dutch participants will include a tourism program manager and a sustainability program manager. Paulus Heule, honorary Dutch consul for West Michigan, will provide opening remarks about the social and economic ties between West Michigan and the Netherland.

Offshore wind energy projects generate low-pollution electricity in many countries in Europe, including the Netherlands, but there are none presently in North America.

“People here have no experience with the technology and are rightfully concerned about potential effects on tourism and coastal communities,” said Erik Nordman, principal investigator for West Michigan Wind Assessment at GVSU.

The event is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Make reservations by e-mailing wind@gvsu.edu or call Erik Nordman at 616-331-8705.

Comments

migpilot

"Offshore wind energy projects generate low-pollution electricity in many countries in Europe, including the Netherlands, but there are none presently in North America.

“People here have no experience with the technology and are rightfully concerned about potential effects on tourism and coastal communities,” said Erik Nordman, principal investigator for West Michigan Wind Assessment at GVSU."....................................

You can bet these people are on Rockford Berge's payroll. The offshore and onshore wind energy companies are on easy street until the grants dry up which by most estimations is very soon. A legitimate science group like GVSU ought not be snowed by this sham of a business. U mm, let see your tax dollars paying for a high tech science project that has a staggering cost multiple per kilowatt hour over coal and nuclear. To boot, they do not even have any solid wind density information on lake Michigan and they think there going to get it from a bobbing laser in the lake on a data buoy produced company who has a vested interest in wind density gathering sites. This machine has a software routine that still has not been perfected and the data can be easily skewed to produce the desired results. Nine months of data is considered the minimum ON LAND to determine if a site will have the required wind density to justify the cost of a turbine installation with a 100 meter wind sample. Now multiply the uncertainty of laser generated wind data (notoriously inaccurate with perpendicular Doppler samples) and the exponentially higher cost of an in the water wind turbine installation. On top of that they have to COMPROMISE the location of the site in order to distribute power as not all immediate landfalls from the desired lake turbine sites can accommodate the distribution of power off the wind farms That my friends is a staggering amount of due diligence. Buyer Beware: this means You. You will end up paying for these sites with your federal tax dollars as well as surcharged electricity rates in the future. The installation companies (Rockford Berge) will be laughing all the way to the bank.

GH55

We already pay a surcharge on our electricity when we burn coal or use nukes. Its called massive pollution, regardless whether it is emitted or controlled. That cost is included in the overall price of power. This state is #10 in mercury pollution, and we have casks of expended fuel sitting on the shores of our Great Lakes. Contrary to what the coal miners would have you believe, there is no such thing as "Clean Coal". there are grades that are a bit cleaner than others, but none of them are "clean"!
It is clear by the comments that there is a definate prejudice to this type of power generation. I for one have made many trips here in this country and in Europe where I have made great efforts to obtain close first hand knowledge of these machines. I, for one, would much rather see a bunch of wind turbines than a 650 foot smoke stack spewing more effluent dwon wind. Dilution is not the solution! We live in a closed environment, eventually we have to deal with it.
Unfortunately, considering the economics, when we are currently paying about 11 cents a KWH, the ROI is quite long. If the cost were 35 to 55 cents per KWH, like in Europe, the picture would be much different.
Wait until it goes up, and it will, then the screaming will begin. "Why didn't you put these things in 20 years back?"
Alternative means of generating electricity must be investigated and not rejected out of fear and prejudice. But, with the political environment that exists in this country, comments like these are business as usual.

migpilot

Thanks for the rebuttal Erick. You said it perfectly "55 cents per KWH". More homes in west Michigan who cannot afford power. Maybe we should transplant the Mitterrand European economic system to west Michigan to make the turbines look like a good deal. The ROI cant even address the life limitation of all the expensive components on these turbines. I hope in all your travels you were able to see the abandoned turbines sitting all over the world.

GH55

I am not Erick, although probably the one you are thinking of is doing a great job promoting alternative energy.
My point was to reflect on the fact that energy costs are only going to increase over time. As the demand grows, the resources are used up, the cost will go up. We either have to find ways to reduce, quit driving behemoths, build sustainable housing that uses greatly reduced energy to heat and light, or find alternative means of producing the needed energy. In this country I can imagine there are many abandoned facilities either for producing electricity from wind or nuclear here in the US. We seem to have a use it then throw it away mentality. In Europe, they have gone well past the first or second generation into newer versions. I can't imagine many being allowed to abandon facilities in most places in Europe. Please provide references.
On the other hand I am proud I have made every effort I can to make as little impact on the use of resources I can. I don't drive a truck, I drive a car that gets about 40 mpg, I built and live in a home that uses about half the energy that the average american home uses, and it is designed to facilitate solar when and if that becomes feasible.
My ultimate point is not do something because you are going to make money from government subsidies, do it because we need to find alternate sources besides burning fossil fuels.

 

Post a Comment

Log in to your account to post comments here and on other stories, galleries and polls. Share your thoughts and reply to comments posted by others. Don't have an account on GrandHavenTribune.com? Create a new account today to get started.