Timeline: Congress' path to federal shutdown

The legislative twists and turns in Congress' battle over the partial government shutdown and the entwined Republican effort to curtail President Barack Obama's health care law:
AP Wire
Oct 2, 2013

Sept. 20: With a potential government shutdown 11 days off, the Republican-run House ignores a White House veto threat and uses a near party-line 230-189 vote to approve legislation denying money for much of the health care law while keeping the government open through Dec. 15. The measure moves to the Democratic-led Senate.

Sept. 24-25: As the Senate debates legislation to keep the government open, tea party Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and other conservatives speak on the chamber's floor for more than 21 consecutive hours against the health care law often called Obamacare. They do not delay or prevent votes, but they help intensify conservative fervor for using the shutdown bill to try forcing Democrats to limit Obamacare.

Sept. 27: The Senate votes 79-19 to end conservative efforts to derail the bill preventing a shutdown, with all Democrats and most Republicans opposing the conservatives. The Senate uses a party-line 54-44 vote to remove the House-approved provision defunding Obamacare, and an identical 54-44 vote to approve the overall bill. The bill, financing agencies through Nov. 15, goes back to the House.

Sept. 29: Just after midnight on Sunday morning, the House uses a rare and lengthy weekend session to shift its demands for restricting Obamacare. By a near party-line 231-192 vote, the House votes to delay implementation of the health care law by a year. It also votes 248-174 to repeal a tax on many medical devices that helps pay for the health care overhaul. The votes send the revamped shutdown bill back to the Senate.

Monday, Sept. 30:

—2:20 p.m. EDT: By 54-46, the Senate removes the House provisions postponing Obamacare and erasing the medical device tax. The shutdown bill moves back to the House.

—8:41 p.m.: The House approves a new shutdown bill 228-201 with different demands on Obamacare. It would delay for a year the requirement that individuals purchase health insurance, and require members of Congress and their staff to pay the full cost of health insurance, without the government paying part of the costs. The measure bounces to the Senate.

—9:37 p.m.: The Senate votes 54-46 to strip the House provisions on individual health insurance and federal health coverage subsidies for lawmakers and staff. The bill returns to the House.

—Shortly before midnight: White House Budget Office Director Sylvia Mathews Burwell sends memo to agency heads stating that a shutdown seems unavoidable and telling them to implement their plans for winding down.

Tuesday, Oct. 1:

—12:01 a.m. EDT: Government's new fiscal year begins. With no spending legislation enacted, partial federal shutdown begins to take effect.

—1:11 a.m.: House votes 228-199 to stand by its language delaying required individual health coverage and blocking federal subsidies for health insurance for lawmakers and staff, and to request formal negotiations with the Senate.

—10 a.m.: Senate votes 54-46 to reject House effort for formal bargaining.

—8:02 p.m.: Republicans stage votes aimed at selectively ending parts of the shutdown. But the chamber rejects each of three bills after the GOP uses an expedited procedure that requires two-thirds majorities for passage. The House votes 264-164 to fund veterans' benefits; 265-161 to let District of Columbia's municipal government spend locally raised funds; and 252-176 to reopen national parks and museums along the National Mall. All three lose.

Wednesday, Oct. 2: Using rules that merely require a simple majority for passage, Republicans push the parks measure through the House by 252-173, a bill reopening the National Institutes of Health by 254-171, and by voice vote a bill letting the District of Columbia municipal government spend funds it raises. Obama summons the top four congressional leaders to the White House to discuss the impasse, but participants report no progress.

 

Comments

Tri-cities realist

At first I thought this was a typical AP hit piece. But after reading it, it is clear to me which chamber and party are mostly responsible for the shutdown. What happened to a willingness to "compromise" that Democrats are so eager to blame on Republicans? The Senate could have funded the govt, but chose not to even agree to formal bargaining. Who is being unreasonable?

And the Senate couldn't find it in themselves to live by the same rules as the rest of us. They preserved the "special subsidy" they receive to help them pay their share of health insurance. So much for the party of the "little guy".

Mystic Michael

A "typical AP hit piece"? Now you think the wire services are out to get you?

So the Senate is to blame, because they wouldn't give in to the political terrorism of the House Republicans? Because they wouldn't agree to kill a duly-passed federal law as the price for the House to fulfill its Constitutional obligation to fund the federal government?

In what alternate universe do you qualify as a "realist"?

trekking

The clean bill is just to pay bills already incurred. There a factions that want gun control, others want universal medical care others want immigration control, etc. The way to do that is to get people on you side until you get enought votes, not try to attach to bill to pay the governments bills.

This would be like us not make mortggae payments, loan payments etc until the lender agrees to whatever we want.

Congress needs to pay bills, plain and simple and used the normal legislative process for changing, adding or amending laws, etc.

Vladtheimp

Wrong - the current dispute is over the spending for the new fiscal year (the old one ended September 30, 2013. You are probably referring to the bill for raising the debt ceiling, which occurs later this month. And that is not about paying for spending that has already occurred - it is mostly for allowing Obama to borrow more money from China for new spending he wants to force on us. Don't believe it - try supporting a new debt ceiling that only raises the debt to cover past spending and no more. Obama and the democrats would nail your hide to the nearest barricade keeping people from visiting their national parks!

trekking

The clean bill is just to pay bills already incurred. There a factions that want gun control, others want universal medical care others want immigration control, etc. The way to do that is to get people on you side until you get enought votes, not try to attach to bill to pay the governments bills.

This would be like us not make mortggae payments, loan payments etc until the lender agrees to whatever we want.

Congress needs to pay bills, plain and simple and used the normal legislative process for changing, adding or amending laws, etc.

Wingmaster

Low information voters are too busy to follow. This will change when they get bit in the a$$ later by blindly sucking up what the media is feeding them.

In the meantime lets hope a purge comes in the Repbulican party. Another cycle of Democrats in power should sufficiently put most people in terrible position and their come uppence will begin.

Careful what you wish for left wingers, you will eventually run out of money and the house of cards will collapse.

Mystic Michael

These Tea Party knuckle draggers won't stop until they finally "succeed" in pushing the country into default. Then once the economy starts to fall apart as a result, what will be their response?

What else? Blame Obama.

Wingmaster

We learned from the best...blame Bush.

I detect a tinge of doubt that the top executive leadership we are experiencing is not working! Get in line and suffer with the rest of us! Try not to drag your knuckles because people will call you names.

Citizen

Nobody pushed Bush into his most detested actions, except, perhaps, for those he chose in his own administration.

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