Windmill restoration gets $375K boost from state

The state has given $375,000 to help restore Windmill Island Gardens in Holland and its more than 250-year-old DeZwaan windmill.
AP Wire
Oct 19, 2013

The grant approved by the Michigan Economic Development Corp. pushes the total amount raised to restore the popular attraction to $820,000, with most of that amount coming from private sources.

"It is a very unique asset, not just to the area, but to the state," Mayor Kurt Dykstra said. "We're not resting until we get it all done."

The city and Holland Township have agreed to contribute an additional $600,000 toward the project over the next six years, including for construction of pedestrian connections to the island with downtown Holland and the township.

"Good things continue to happen, and this is a huge part of it," City Manager Ryan Cotton said of the grant.

Restoration of the windmill, which has been inoperable since the spring, is expected to be finished this year.

Other work includes repairs to the gardens' antique carousel and street organ. The carousel was built in 1908 and bought in the 1970s by the city of Holland, which is known for its Dutch heritage. The organ was built in 1928 and given to Holland in 1947 by the city of Amsterdam.

Windmill Island Gardens is a popular destination for tourists, especially during the city's annual Tulip Time festival each spring. Contributions for the fundraising campaign may be made through the city's website or through the Community Foundation of the Holland-Zeeland Area.

Comments

Barry Soetoro

Just when you thought they couldn't come up with a more frivolous waste of taxpayer money.....

Barry Soetoro

Just when you thought they couldn't come up with a more frivolous waste of taxpayer money.....

LessThanAmused

I like windmills.... and wooden shoes.... and tulips......oh and Klompen dancing, definitely klompen dancing.....

Lanivan

And Gouda, split pea soup, and banket, especially the banket...

Lanivan

Well, it's clear you are not Dutch.....

LessThanAmused

Nope, I'm not much. See the Redskin's thread and maybe that'll hold a partial clue.

Lanivan

I was referring to Barry's comment - follow the format, please...but now I'm curious so will check-out the Redskin's thread.

LessThanAmused

Yeah, figured that out too late. Especially bad after I was yanking Masterwings chain for doing the same thing. Maybe if you don't tell him he won't notice and I'll get away with one. Shhhhh :-)

Lanivan

Not to worry - he won't find out from me. We're on the skids.....

Wingmaster

Hi

LessThanAmused

Rats!

Lanivan

busted...

LessThanAmused

How about "do as I say, not as I do". Will that work?

Wingmaster

Sure, sounds like a good liberal policy....Snap:-)

LessThanAmused

Ok, you win that round, I got nothin'.

Wingmaster

What the - ? Now I'm speechless! "Your" getting agreeable. "Their", how's that.

LessThanAmused

You did that on purpose, I'm not biting. Bad Man.

Lanivan

American Indian? I have a drop of Cherokee.....

LessThanAmused

Plus liberal (oh, did I just use the L word??) amounts of French and German. And people wonder why I get a bit testy from time to time.

My mother did research on all that stuff for years and years and amassed quite a bit of interesting info. Lots of cool stories nobody, including my kids, wants to hear.

Lanivan

I'm into it, too. Would love to hear your stories. What has kept me interested: I'm a direct ancestor of: the first person to step off Mayflower onto Plymouth Rock; the first marriage in the Plymouth Colonies (Longfellow wrote a poem about it) - pinkie up!; ancestors have fought in every war that has taken place in US/colonies; a Founding Father; guys who were close to the King (British) and made him so mad he had them both be-headed, one posthumously. And then of course, my great, great, great grandfather who married a Cherokee woman, which was a story I grew up with and was thrilled to find out it was true. The romance!

LessThanAmused

Well, she never got that far back, but she did find out the name of the ship that her decendants came over on (can't recall it right now off the top of my head, she has all that paperwork). They arrived in Canada in the mid 1700's from France and slowly, over several generations worked their way south to the USA. The last named was changed from Fortine to Fortin at some point, probably at entry to the US as it was a common practice back then to shorten up the surname and/or change the spelling.
My Great Grandfather started out as a fur trapper in Ontario and worked his way down to Michigan in the mid 1800's to end up working for Hackley as a camp cook in his lumbering empire. I'm not sure if it was common practice or if it was a special deal, but once the land was berift of the white pine that once grew there, Hackley sold sections of the land to his employees who wanted to try their hand at farming. Great Grandfather bought a 140 acres from Hackley, west of Big Rapids, in Newaygo County and started a family and a farm there. The date on the cornerstone on the barn is/was 1866 and until a couple years ago it sat there and housed horses, cattle and sheep at different times.
I could go on and on, but that's probably enough for now. Some of my best memories as a munchkin are at the farm, in the summer, hanging out with gramps on the tractor and working in his workshop. They had a milkhouse where I got my first taste of raw milk, yuck and helped my grandma collect eggs from the chicken coop. My uncle sold the property off awhile ago as neither he nor his kids wanted anything to do with the place so now strangers live there. Ticks me off that I don't have access to it any longer, but we didn't have the money to buy it so somebody else did. Such is life I guess.

Lanivan

Your ancestors lived through much of important Michigan history - and I love the food connection.

I have a strong farm heritage, as well, and share the same fate - neither of the family farms has any connection to the present generation. Sad. But we do have some great pictures of the farms/farmhouses, and drive by often when we are in the area. They are thriving, well-maintained farms, so I am grateful for that, at least.

I love old barns - is your barn, circa 1866, still standing? I photograph and frame them - maybe you have photos of yours??

LessThanAmused

Ha! Sure, bring up the food connection.

As for the barn, after years of neglect, it fell in on itself one winter awhile ago. When my uncle moved down to G.R. he pretty much just let the place go to pot. I'd go up there from time to time with my camera gear and try to document the demise. I have lots of pics of the barn and the workshop, the milkhouse and the chicken coops, all gone now.

I did take some stuff for myself after the barn fell. I've got a piece of the foundation and a board that I've turned into a mantle for the downstairs fireplace.

One thing that may be interesting. Back when the barn was built metal nails were rare and expensive so the whole barn was put together with wooden pegs. A process that was fairly common back then. I've got some of the almost 150 year old pegs.

Lanivan

150 year old wooden pegs! What a shame it is in ruins. But great that you had the foresight to gather up some treasures and captured it via photos. And especially so that you have incorporated a bit of it into your home.

Did it have a stone foundation? That's my next favorite thing about old barns. Really adds to the composition....

By the way, just to keep on-topic and avoid being scolded, I think it's great the state is investing in the renovation of the Holland windmill - I never mind when my taxpayer money goes into historic preservation. I do mind when radicals shut down government and fritter away $24 Billion+ just to make a point.

Wingmaster

Seeing so your bringing up wasteful political spending, I'm sure you will join me in chastising the administrations wasting of over $500 million to produce a website that has not even came close to the lofty predictions of how easy it would be to use.

I'm sure you're equally disgusted by the untold $'s it will cost to fix it!

LessThanAmused

I'm sure you're equally "discussed"....Disgusted Maybe?

As far as the website goes...sounds like a classic SNAFU situation. I did some beta testing for a gaming company back in the late 90's and we spent a year and a half going over every line of code before it ever went live (online).

For whoever is responsible for this health care website, it's amazingly stupid for them to think that they're going to get a site the size and complexity of this one up and running in a couple weeks.
(Of course that's based on what I've read on the topic so far). It wouldn't be a surprise at all to see them still struggling to rid it of it's bugs 6 months from now. We shall see.

Wingmaster

Thanks, fixed.

Another serious question is why o why wasn't this thing tested to death and analyzed to see if it could handle the data load?

I am just stunned with all of the focus on this thing that they would allow such crappy roll out after bragging recently how easy it would be to sign up.

Surely this is a management style flaw at the very least.

Tri-cities realist

I would think that local residents and businesses would step up to donate, so that taxpayers wouldn't have to... oh wait, they're Dutch (not to worry, I'm part Dutch too)

CAT

Hello, Roger Bergman . . .

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