FCS buys Chromebooks

A technology pilot program is set to expand in Fruitport schools this fall.
Krystle Wagner
Jun 28, 2014

 

The district is in the process of purchasing about 450 Chromebooks, which is estimated to cost about $95,000 after an expected rebate of almost $35,000.

Superintendent Bob Szymoniak said the devices will be paid for through the state’s Durant Fund, which is earmarked for technology.

“Students are much more engaged in course matter through the use of technology than they are with textbooks,” Szymoniak said.

The program expansion comes on the heels of a yearlong Chromebook pilot program involving classrooms at Fruitport middle and high schools, as well as a one-classroom iPad program at Beach Elementary School.

Currently, the district isn’t looking to purchase additional iPads because of the cost, but they are looking into other tablets that could work for younger students, Szymoniak said.

In the upcoming school year, two classrooms per Fruitport elementary school – Beach, Edgewood and Shettler – three classes at Fruitport Middle School and two classes at Fruitport High School, will have Chromebooks. Additional devices will be purchased for classrooms to sign out and use.

Jeff Grossenbacher, the technology director for Fruitport Community Schools, said the expansion targets grades 3-12. He said the program isn’t a true 1-to-1 initiative because the devices stay in the selected classrooms, and students use the devices throughout the day.

Read the complete story in Saturday’s print or e-edition of the Grand Haven Tribune.

Comments

AG4CB

I'm not surprised that Google has been successful at getting Chromebooks into schools. They're easy for students to use and for the IT staff to manage. The price is reasonable, so if they're lost, stolen or damaged, they're easier to replace.

One issue is that many web-based education applications need Java, which Chromebooks do not support. And some schools may still be running Windows applications. A way around these issues is with a solution like Ericom AccessNow, an HTML5 RDP solution that enables Chromebook users to connect to any RDP host, including Terminal Server and VDI virtual desktops, and run Windows applications or desktops in a browser tab. That means that you can open up an Internet Explorer session inside a Chrome browser tab, and then connect to the applications that require Java and run them on the Chromebook.

For more information about AccessNow for Chromebooks in Education, visit:
http://www.ericom.com/Education-...

Please note that I work for Ericom

newsblogger

Wouldn't it have made more sense to just get surface tablets than to buy a Google Chromebook and have to use a solution like Ericom AccessNow, an HTML5 RDP solution that enables Chromebook users to connect to any RDP host, including Terminal Server and VDI virtual desktops, and run Windows applications or desktops in a browser tab? I suspect (just my opinion) Googles donations have something to do with why their product was selected.

 

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