GHAPS looks at future needs

As Grand Haven staff and students get into the swing of the new school year, the district’s school board is looking to the future. And that could bring a bond proposition before district voters.
Krystle Wagner
Sep 25, 2013

In coming weeks, the school board will make a decision about the best approach to meet district needs for technology, safety, security and facilities — which were outlined during a recent work session.

The board is looking into creating a bond proposal for voters that would include one-to-one technology, infrastructure improvements, desktop replacements, instructional technology replacement, phone system upgrade, equipment replacement and updated security cameras. The bond would also include bus replacements, improved traffic areas for Grand Haven High School and Lakeshore Middle School, public address system upgrades, districtwide fencing, asbestos removal, asphalt replacement, equipment replacement, and improvements to athletic facilities.

District officials are considering a bond that would replace a current bond debt due to expire, which would mean no increase in taxes. It would generate about $32 million over a 10-year period.

The district could also generate $2.3 million for each additional one-tenth of a mill increase over 10 years.

Voters in the Grand Haven school district have previously supported bond proposals that have included technology, safety improvements, athletic facilities and energy-efficiency updates.

Doug Start, the district’s technology director, said a committee comprised of staff, parents, school board members and local businesses has spent the past year looking at the district’s technology needs. He said discussions didn’t focus on specific items, but rather increasing access to tools that will allow students to create and collaborate together for "21st-century learning."

The committee also visited districts comparable to Grand Haven’s size to learn from their challenges and successes.

To read more of this story, see today’s print or e-edition of the Grand Haven Tribune.

Comments

Vladtheimp

Hey, why not add some more burdens to the taxpayer, seeing as according to the Census Bureau, Revenues from state and local individual income taxes, general sales and gross receipt taxes, motor fuel taxes, motor vehicle taxes and taxes on alcoholic beverages each hit all-time highs in the second quarter of this year. -

Americans paid a record of $114.032 billion in state and local individual income taxes in the second quarter of this year, according to the Census Bureau. That was up $7.787 billion—or 7.3 percent—from the previous all-time record of $106.245 billion in state and local individual income taxes that Americans paid in the second quarter of 2008.

Americans also paid a record of $82.212 billion in state and local general sales and gross receipts taxes in the second quarter of this year. That was up $1.85 billion—or 2.3 percent—from the previous record of $80.362 billion in general sales and gross receipts taxes American paid in the second quarter of 2008.

Americans paid a record of $11.254 billion in state and local motor fuels taxes in the second quarter of 2013. That was up $135 million—or 1.2 percent—from the previous record of $11.119 billion paid in the second quarter of 2012.

Americans paid a record $7.945 billion in state and local motor vehicles taxes in the second quarter of 2013. That was up $43 million—or 0.5 percent—from the previous record of $7.902 billion paid in the second quarter of 2012.

Americans paid a record of $1.827 billion in state and local alcoholic beverage taxes in the second quarter of 2013. That was up $25 million—or 1.4 percent—from the previous record of $1.802 billion paid in the second quarter of 2012.

And that doesn't include the new taxes under Obama and Obamacare!

http://cnsnews.com/news/article/...

Freddo

@VladtheImp: Most of those record tax levels, as I'm sure you noticed, are simply the sign of a (very slowly) strengthening economy. The taxes received are high because there are more people, so the figures are naturally higher, even if the rates don't change. The federal tax burden is still extremely low by historical standards, which you didn't address.

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