Where can I get E85?

Dave of Grand Haven asked, “Where’s the closest gas station that sells E85 fuel? My car is one of those flex-fuel cars and can run on E85, but I haven’t seen any gas station in the Tri-Cities that sells it.”
Mark Brooky
Mar 19, 2014

ANSWER:

According to the website ethanolretailer.com, the Meijer gas stations in Norton Shores and on East 16th Street in Holland, and the Vriesland Country Store on Byron Road in Zeeland all sell E85, and there are several in the Grand Rapids area.

But there are none in Northwest Ottawa County.

An alternative fuel station called Anew opened this month on 84th Avenue in Zeeland Township, just south of the Zeeland Farm Services offices, and it is selling the ethanol–based fuel under the Yellow Hose program with the pledge to keep the price at least $1 per gallon lower than the price of regular unleaded gasoline. When the station opened, the average local price of 87-octane gasoline was $3.70 per gallon, and Anew priced its E85 fuel at $2.59 per gallon.

E85 is a mixture of 85 percent ethanol and 15 percent gasoline. Proponents say it is a clean-burning, high-octane fuel produced from renewable sources, namely grain alcohol produced from crops such as corn.

But, keep in mind, it burns faster than traditional unleaded gasoline because, according to experts, it has a lower energy content. According to Joe Wiesenfelder in a story for Cars.com, E85 produces 27 percent less energy per gallon than gasoline.

“For example, the flex-fuel 2010 Chevrolet Impala equipped with a 3.5-liter V-6 engine gets an EPA-estimated 18/29 mpg (city/highway) on gasoline and 14/21 mpg when burning E85,” Wiesenfelder notes. “The acceleration is pretty much the same, but the car's range is shortened. In other words, you'll be filling the tank more often when using E85. Do the math and you'll discover that E85 must be priced roughly 28 percent less than gas just to break even.”

CLICK HERE for a calculator to see if the price of E85 is worth it, mileage-wise.

CLICK HERE for the state’s take on E85 fuel. The state also provides links to find alternative fuel retailers across the country.

 

If you would like to see a list of flexible fuel vehicles that can run on alternative fuels, visit e85vehicles.com.

 

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Comments

Robtownredneck

I spend a good deal of time out western midwest. I have bought e85 for as low as 1.50 in Iowa. My experiance is about a 20% differance and less if towing a load. Maybe 10-15% if towing. Oddly enough a car equipped to run e85 will make lots more HP with it. For instance a new GM 5.3 makes 355 hp on gas but makes 380 on e85. Thats right out on the GM catalog. E85 has been a windfall for the large welfare corporate farmers. Where I go most farmers have an Escalade in the back barn ever since the ethanol mandate took effect. It may be good for the enviroment but its been detrimental to wildlife and conservation. Greed has taken over and farmers are planting more and more without regaurd for crop rotation and soil conservation. Remember the dust bowl. As long as the govmt will garrentee them a profit it will continue. I used to burn it every chance I had. I no longer do.

Back to the Wall

We are sacrificing our food to fuel our cars. Have you noticed the increase in food costs over the last several years?

Much of our diet has its origin in corn. Milk, meat, eggs, poultry, sweets, all corn based. And fruits and vegetables are effected too, as food plots are replaced with higher grossing corn. I'd rather use less gas and have more affordable food. Ethanol is a knee jerk solution, and we haven't seen the worst of its unintended consequences.

Oh, Jerry's Citgo at Beacon and Washington sells uncut, pure petroleum gasoline. Your car will thank you and you'll not be contributing to the pillage of our nation's breadbasket.

gordbzz231

Friend of mine insists using premium gasoline in his flex fuel truck, is that correct or a waste ? i believe corn is for ethanol, i just read that 80 percent of the corn we grow here goes over sea,s, i think that,s crazy

Boater

We had a Jeep Grand Cherokee with flexfuel and every time we put E85 in the tank, the "Check Engine" light came on. I quit using E85.

FanoBucs

I drive 2008 Chevy Impala. I calculate that I need the price of E85 to be $.60 less than normal gas to economically use. I have used it several times in the car and found no appreciable difference in the performance.

As far as Pillaging our food supply, this is spoken by somebody that is not learning all the facts before they are speaking. Until the government quits paying farmers to NOT grow crops. We don't have a problem.

Also to the person that only uses premium fuel in the car. If your car is designed for regular it can be actually bad for the car to use premium. Premiun is not a higher quality gasoline. It has a higher octane which is designed for motors with high compression. A motor that has higher compression needs a SLOWER burning fuel or it could actually harm the engine. Premium is SLOWER burning than regular gas or E-85.

FanoBucs

I drive 2008 Chevy Impala. I calculate that I need the price of E85 to be $.60 less than normal gas to economically use. I have used it several times in the car and found no appreciable difference in the performance.

As far as Pillaging our food supply, this is spoken by somebody that is not learning all the facts before they are speaking. Until the government quits paying farmers to NOT grow crops. We don't have a problem.

Also to the person that only uses premium fuel in the car. If your car is designed for regular it can be actually bad for the car to use premium. Premiun is not a higher quality gasoline. It has a higher octane which is designed for motors with high compression. A motor that has higher compression needs a SLOWER burning fuel or it could actually harm the engine. Premium is SLOWER burning than regular gas or E-85.

Back to the Wall

Perhaps "...until the government stops paying farmers to grow corn for ethanol we'll continue to have a problem..." is more like it, I think.

That, and many fuel systems made before 1995 or so will rot and fail as a result of ethanol in fuel.

I have done my homework, and have concluded that sacrificing our food for fuel is a very poor idea.

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