OUR VIEWS: Hunt opposition off target

Sep 21, 2012

 

Some of the concerns may be valid, but others are way off target.

The problem occurs when people forget that these are wild creatures and instead view them as some sort of lovable Disney creation.

These are real animals, living in a natural world that is unkind and unforgiving. Toss out your misconceptions that these are cute, cuddly, peaceful creatures. They're not. These are living, breathing animals that have three primary goals in life: to eat, to avoid predators and to reproduce.

And these wild creatures are capable of overrunning the land on which they live, which is the case in many residential areas across the state. They have no natural predators, other than the occasional coyote.

A more legitimate concern about the proposed North Ottawa Dunes hunt is safety, but even those concerns are overblown. Non-hunters often assume that all deer hunters behave like Amos Slade, the trigger-happy protagonist in Disney's "The Fox and the Hound” who sends lead flying in every direction whenever he's out on the hunt.

In reality, hunters are an inherently safe bunch. The number of hunting accidents in Michigan number around a dozen per year, and many of those involve hunters falling out of tree stands. The number of times a hunter actually fires his bow or his gun and hits something other than his intended target is miniscule.

Granted, North Ottawa Dunes is situated adjacent to a few residential areas, notably North Holiday Hills. But many hunters already set up their blinds in areas close to residential areas. This is nothing new.

Deer hunts have been held in other popular parks across the state. Near Traverse City, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore draws hundreds of thousands of visitors each year, and the park is open to hunting during the fall months.

While we realize that not everyone will support this hunt, we recognize the need to manage the deer herd at North Ottawa Dunes. We’ll put our faith in the experts who recommended the hunt, and our faith in those who participate in the hunt to do so safely.

Our Views reflects the majority opinion of the members of the Grand Haven Tribune editorial board: Kevin Hook, Cheryl Welch, Matt DeYoung, Liz Stuck and Fred VandenBrand. What do you think? E-mail us a letter to the editor to news@grandhaventribune.com or log-in to our website and leave a comment below.
 

Comments

ghresident

Have you done google map view of this 500 acre parcel yet? the only residential areas are directly north & east of the Coast Guard park. Theres more than enough adequate space west of the park for a safe hunt. And yet you still havent posted any ballistics data to back up your supposed
data.

GN

http://www.therepublic.com/view/...




St. Clair County boy, 17, killed in hunting accident in Michigan's Thumb area




September 21, 2012 - 12:20 pm EDT




BROCKWAY TOWNSHIP, Mich. — Police say a 17-year-old boy from Brockway Township has been killed in what appears to be a hunting accident in Michigan's Thumb area.




St. Clair County Sheriff Tim Donnellon says in a statement that Devon Derouin was hunting deer on private property at 7:30 p.m. Thursday when he was shot by another hunter who was looking for coyote. Donnellon says the 24-year-old coyote hunter saw movement in some brush under a tree about 450 feet away and fired once, hitting Derouin.




Police say the coyote hunter was with two other people, but it was unclear if they had permission from the landowner to hunt on Thursday night.




No further details were released. An investigation is ongoing.

ghresident

And your point is? This hunter never seen his intended target. He asumed....therefore he's negligent.

Smartie

The point being what, you ask?
Are you saying that this couldn't possibly happen here?
What bubble are you living in?
450' is supposed to be more than adequate for setbacks, well, obviously it's not, and that 17-yr old kid is proof positive!

ghresident

As I said, this hunter never seen his intended target. He asumed. therfore he is at fault for not knowing his target before discharging his weapon. Its trully sad that someone had to loose there life due to a stupid decision or just a careless hunter. Since it was bow season, bow hunters are not required to wear hunters orange.

Smartie

Nobody mentioned bowhunting in the article pertaining to the 17-yr old kid being killed. What does that have to do with anything?
It wouldn't have made a difference if the kid had been dressed in orange blaze from head to toe - he was behind a bush! Are there no bushes around here?

ghresident

I assumed, and forgot about the Early Antlerless Firearm hunt.

Smartie

Never assume! That's the problem with people carrying deadly weapons, they shoot first and ask questions later...The first rule in hunting is to identify your targety. Just thinking that it's an animal, and what kind of animal, isn't good enough - as has been proven time and again, hunters mistaking people for whatever animals they targeted. Those concerned with safety in residential neighborhoodsd are out-shouted by those who don't care nor want to admit that there's a potential safety issue with lethal weapons carried by hunters with buck fever, so eager to kill a deer, that any movement suddenly becomes a real target. Buck fever is a real phenomenon, it's not just a term - look it up!

Say No To Tourist's

Careless hunters shoot first and ask questions later, please read my new post near the top of the page. I hunt residential areas through out Ottawa County, never in my life would I put someone at risk "buck fever" or not. I carry everday day. The second amendment and my CCW gives me that right. Now your saying I'm a threat to society? Hardly.

Smartie

You talkin' to me?
What's your question?

Wingmaster

Your lack of knowledge on this subject is stunning. My bet is even those that are on your side of the issue are cringing each time you post. I truly feel sorry for you.

Smartie

It might help if you had qualified exactly what part of my knowledge you are questioning...generalizations are just too easy - bet you can't really put it into words without making a fool of yourself again, can you, Wing(master?)....

RenegadeX

Mortality
All unintentional injury deaths
Number of deaths: 118,021
Deaths per 100,000 population: 38.4
Cause of death rank: 5
Unintentional fall deaths
Number of deaths: 24,792
Deaths per 100,000 population: 8.1
Motor vehicle traffic deaths
Number of deaths: 34,485
Deaths per 100,000 population: 11.2
Unintentional poisoning deaths
Number of deaths: 31,758
Deaths per 100,000 population:

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/...

GN

I don't have a problem if the editorial board members invite hunters to hunt in their own back yards, as long as I'm not their neighbor, but they don't have a right to invite hunters to hunt in my back yard, and put my family at risk.

Say No To Tourist's

This is where you’re wrong, the state mandates a 450’ setback from any occupied dwelling on state or private land. Say I’m your neighbor and own hunt able land or have permission on that property. I can legally hunt it. This is where you have no say, you could try and stop a person from hunting the property, but you may be setting yourself up for a hunter harassment ticket which carries a maximum fine of $500 or 90 days in jail, or both. During the whole deer hunting season, a person bow hunting you may never see them at all, gun season you’d see blaze orange in your back yard IF a person wanted to hunt that close to your property. By looking at the aerial view of this parcel, if in fact you live in the area of Coast Guard park, you would either be in the condo’s in Park Place circle or on the corner of Mohawk and Alpine CT, Swiss drive, who knows maybe you just a renter in Woodland Ridge Apartments. I can’t honestly see a person hunting this small area of trees with the abundance of open property directly west of the Main Park and even north towards Hoffmaster State park, Then again there’s the possibility you could live on N Shore Estates RD. Where you have nothing to worry about with all the high dune areas around there. Heck maybe you don’t even live in this area, I do see your concern and your misconceptions on hunting because of some of these accidents that can and do happen. I feel for the family that just lost their 17yr old son and send my thoughts and prayers out to them. But what your forgetting is YOUR ancestors had to hunt to feed their family’s and the majority of us that hunt are not gun slinging crazed maniacs who’s only intention is to kill everything that walks and fly’s by us and has no respect for others property and safety. For the most part a very large percent of us following our heritage enjoy the sights and sounds nature provides us hunting, not only does it give us an out to everyday life, it give us a chance to relieve stress and regroup our lives. No matter who says were putting you or your property in danger were not with the exception of a select few who should not be hunting at all in my opinion. Us seasoned vets who have been hunting for years, we know what we’re doing, we know safe handling of guns and our intended targets and what’s behind it. I would rather pass on a shot not knowing what lies behind it or taking a chance on something I may have to live with for the rest of my life. We hunters will defend our self’s to the bitter end on this debate. If something major was to happen to society, loss of all utilities, transportation and all sources of food were gone. Could you survive from the land? Us hunters could very easily, our ancestors did.

RenegadeX

Who is hunting in your backyard? Kind of presumptious for you to consider parklands paid for by taxpayers as YOUR backyard, no?

Spartan49417

I vote to do nothing and let the deer starve to death. The vegetation will be destroyed and then Smartie can explain to its kid or grand kid the reason mother nature allows the deer to starve.

Alternatively ....if firearms are the concern lets limit the weapons to archery or buckshot from elevated stands. This would eliminate the risk of errant shots traveling 450 feet.

FYI....your claim that a 12 gauge slug would travel 5000+ feet is flat out wrong.....and not even close. You should check your facts. I would welcome an opportunity fir you to shoot one of my 12 gauge shotguns and measure the distance a slug travels. We can do this safely....and I would be happy to demonstrate for you and or anyone else that wishes to test it out. We will shoot it @ 50 yards so you can verify it is on and then move back to 300 yards. Target will be 30 inches off ground. Slug will not reach the target if you hold the crosshairs on it.

Spartan49417

I vote to do nothing and let the deer starve to death. The vegetation will be destroyed and then Smartie can explain to its kid or grand kid the reason mother nature allows the deer to starve.

Alternatively ....if firearms are the concern lets limit the weapons to archery or buckshot from elevated stands. This would eliminate the risk of errant shots traveling 450 feet.

FYI....your claim that a 12 gauge slug would travel 5000+ feet is flat out wrong.....and not even close. You should check your facts. I would welcome an opportunity fir you to shoot one of my 12 gauge shotguns and measure the distance a slug travels. We can do this safely....and I would be happy to demonstrate for you and or anyone else that wishes to test it out. We will shoot it @ 50 yards so you can verify it is on and then move back to 300 yards. Target will be 30 inches off ground. Slug will not reach the target if you hold the crosshairs on it.

Wingmaster

Lets hope Smartie is not trying to teach anything to children. It would be a disservice to their development. I'm all for the bowhunting idea. Can't make the argument that arrows would be whizzing thru neighborhoods. Bet Smartie and other anti hunters would just switch gears and blather on about some other nonsense.

Smartie

Fear not, I promise to blather a bit more on Monday.

kathy p.

When I lived in another area, a young 16 year old teenage boy was shot and killed while chopping wood in his back yard. A hunter made a mistake and shot him, because he thought he was an animal. So it does happen.

Wingmaster

Where we all live people die everyday from mistakes people make in judgement, we don't stop living or doing. Your statement is pointless. Hunting is safer than most activities due to the respect most have while using the tool of the sport.

RenegadeX

Some things are just too ironic.
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/...

Wingmaster

Still not one alternative solution to the over browse problem. Just more hype about gun safety. As I said before, this area has terrain that is hilly. A buffer zone can be expanded further if deemed necessary. Most homes are behind these hills. Hunting did occur for many years in this area without incident. The hunt that is going to be conducted this year is a controlled hunt with hunters that will be required to attend an orientation and safety guidelines to the hunt. Those opposed to this hunt are mostly anti hunters or those who are believing the hype of the hunt/guns being unsafe. Accidents can occur no matter what you do in life. I can provide statistics that support the fact that hunting is more safe then many activities people engage in. This discussion has become redundant without any fresh thinking. Those on the opposition just focus on rallying their friends and neighbors to be against the hunt. Those that understand the over browse problem are trying to discuss the issue with reason, are only being met with personal attacks and nonsensical objections to stop the hunt. The Trib, after some prompting, comes up with an article that supports the hunt. I long ago dropped my subscription because of the bias reporting on hunting and other topics. I have many areas to hunt. I do not have to hunt there. I do have a deep connection to this area and hate to see it over browsed to the point of damage that will take years to fix. This hunt is a reasonable, safe, cost effective way to control the damage. If your not part of the solution, your part of the problem.

Say No To Tourist's

Drunk drivers kill more people than hunters do, statistics prove it.

Smartie

I cannot believe that an adult human being would even suggest such a thing! Driving is essential to everyday life, there are a gigantic number of drivers versus a teeny percentage of hunters, mainly trophy and recreational!
Any logical human being can see that!

Say No To Tourist's

Ok you win but. 250,000 people have died in alcohol-related accidents in the past 10 years; 25,000 people die each year in alcohol related accidents; 500 people are killed weekly and 71 people daily in alcohol-related accidents; one American life is lost every 20 minutes in an alcohol-related car crash; and one out of every two Americans is likely to be involved in an alcohol-related accident in his lifetime. Every year, 708,000 persons are injured, 74,000 of them seriously, in alcohol-related crashes. About 2,000 people receive injuries each day in alcohol-related accidents.

A recent study reveals that alcohol-impaired drivers cost American taxpayers $21 - $24 billion dollars per year. According to a recent National Geographic report, alcohol abuse costs American society $136 billion and 65,000 lives annually.

Smartie

Hunters still represent only about 6% nationally....so, pecentage-wise, their accidents and fatalities are significant, considering that it's all in the name of recreation/trophy hunting!

RenegadeX

Well, let's run the numbers shall we? There are 300 million citizens in the country and we'll include all of them since driving is "essential". Auto accidents kill 43,000 annually. That's a death rate of 14.3 per 100,000. There are approximately 37 million citizens who hunt. Using the number of accidental deaths each year of 100 cited by a poster in another thread who opposes the use of hunting to manage populations of deer, that's an accidental death rate of 0.270 per 100,000 participants.

And here are other rates: Firearms are involved in 0.5% of accidental deaths nationally, compared to motor vehicles (37%), poisoning (22%), falls (17%), suffocation (5%), drowning (2.9%), fires (2.5%), medical mistakes (1.7%), environmental factors (1.3%), and pedal cycles (0.7%). Among children: motor vehicles (41%), suffocation (21%), drowning (15%), fires (8%), pedal cycles (2%), poisoning (2%), falls (1.9%), environmental factors (1.5%), firearms (1.1%) and medical mistakes (1%). Link to that info here: http://nraila.org/issues/FactShe.... So, what were you saying about hunting accidents?

Wingmaster

He, he, I love you man!

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