We're always interested in hearing about news in our community. Let us know what's going on!

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WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic-controlled House voted Tuesday to pass a $1.4 trillion government spending package, handing President Donald Trump a victory on his U.S.-Mexico border fence while giving Democrats spending increases across a swath of domestic programs.

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LANSING (AP) — Gov. Gretchen Whitmer rallied with teachers earlier this week to push for a sizable boost in school spending, saying a "failure" in the Capitol has contributed to worsening educational outcomes for Michigan kids.

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While the layoffs at Ford Motor Co. are the latest to grab headlines, the automaker isn’t alone in trimming its payrolls. Retailers, snack foods companies, manufacturers and others are cutting costs across the country, too.

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LANSING (AP) — Michigan's Legislature was poised Friday to pass a bill that would cut the country's highest auto insurance premiums by letting drivers forego a one-of-a-kind requirement to buy unlimited medical coverage for crash injuries.

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(StatePoint) Kids often view money as having one function only: to buy stuff, right now. Give a young child $5 and he’ll likely spend it all, often looking for things that cost $5.

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America's "recession obsession" is ongoing. We're glued to each dip in the Dow. We're hanging on every bit of news on layoffs, late car payments and bad economic luck. We're worried that somehow, the 10-year economic expansion is coming to a halt.

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During his 90-minute presentation Tuesday morning on the economic forecast for Northwest Ottawa County, Dr. Paul Isley used the word “recession” more than 30 times.

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Many times, the New Year kicks off with a huge financial hangover. But this year, we're looking at even more reasons to keep an eye on our money.

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LANSING — Michigan would shift income tax revenue away from the School Aid Fund toward road repairs and environmental cleanups under legislation approved by the Legislature Friday morning during the frenetic lame-duck session.

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Grand Haven’s streets have seen better days, and more than double the current annual investment is needed to maintain existing quality and improve the system, city officials say. 

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FRUITPORT TWP. – Nearly 90 minutes into a public hearing at Fruitport Middle School Wednesday night, no one voiced opposition to the proposed Little River Band of Ottawa Indians casino project.

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Voters in Ottawa County will decide in the November election whether to raise the maximum county tax levy or leave it up to the county, local municipalities and the Ottawa Area Intermediate School District (OAISD). 

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WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers kept up a brisk hiring pace in June by adding 213,000 jobs, a sign of confidence in the economy despite the start of a potentially punishing trade war with China.

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Preparing tax returns is never fun, but some businesses are helping to ease the pain by offering freebies and special deals on Tax Day, which this year is April 17 (today).

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(AP) — The Republican tax overhaul is giving most Americans a break on their federal income taxes. But fallout from the same law means many people could actually see their state income taxes rise.

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Dr. Paul Isley, associate dean for undergraduate programs at the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University, provided a sunny economic forecast for 2018 during a meeting of local business leaders Tuesday morning.

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(AP) — In New Jersey and California, top Democratic officials want to let people make charitable contributions to the state instead of paying certain taxes. In Connecticut and New York, officials are exploring a switch from income taxes to new ones on payroll. A few governors have even calle…

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According to one festive and fun annual economic indicator, the cost of this holiday season for shoppers is not expected to rise a significant amount over last year.

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LANSING (AP) — The Michigan Supreme Court on Wednesday ordered the state to return $554 million to nearly 275,000 school employees and retirees who saw a portion of their pay illegally deducted for retiree health care for about two years, ending a lengthy legal battle that stretched across t…